Nauvoo Thoughts 1

Allison familyphotos 0614 050It’s been about a week since we visited Nauvoo, and I’ve been thinking a lot about it. Our whole trip had nice weather, except for the day we decided to spend in Nauvoo. It rained. Lots. We took a covered wagon ride around the town, and even though it was covered, everyone still had to wrap up in several layers of blankets in order to stay dry and warm. While there were dozens of old houses and other attractions to visit, the one thing that I really felt excited about was the brass band’s hymn concert.

Before each hymn, a band member would stand up and give a little information about the hymn and a short testimony.We haven’t had too many Sundays since Bonnie got her most recent diagnosis, so I wasn’t really prepared for how much the hymns would affect me. The hymns talk about faith and hope, but those virtues are often described in the context of exercising them while experiencing loss, pain, and death.

Praise to the Man is all about the martyrdom of Joseph Smith.
How Firm a Foundation talks about God being with us in our trials. Sickness, fear, fiery trials, poverty–all of those and more get a mention in this song.
Lead, Kindly Light takes us through encircling darkness so thick that you can’t even see one step ahead.
Be Still My Soul describes all of us as burdened with a cross, which is not immediately lifted. The advice given is to have patience and bear your cross along thorny ways.
Brightly Beams our Father’s Mercy talks about people stuck in sin and being lost and alone in life’s storms.
Come, Come, Ye Saints is especially poignant in Nauvoo when it talks about dying “before our journey’s through” because of all the people who lost their lives before making it to Utah.

Listening to all the hymns, I was struck with a sense of how much the composers understood life. These hymns deal with difficult subjects, and they’re not meant to be simple platitudes or lip service to faith and endurance. The people who wrote these words understood. Bonnie’s cancer is an overwhelming, heart-breaking, gut-wrenching, soul-crushing experience.

But (and here’s the important part) this experience won’t break my little family if we don’t let it, and the way to get through is to cling to God. I find comfort in one of the other hymns that the band played: If You Could Hie to Kolob. Pain, sorrow, and heartache-even death-are all temporary things. The things that really matter are eternal.

There is no end to virtue;
There is no end to might;
There is no end to wisdom;
There is no end to light.

There is no end to union;
There is no end to youth;
There is no end to priesthood;
There is no end to truth.

There is no end to glory;
There is no end to love;
There is not end to being;
There is no death above.

4 thoughts on “Nauvoo Thoughts 1

  1. Adam, thank you so much for your insight and strength. I love how you have been able to find comfort in these hymns. I know how musical you are and I would imagine that music is able to touch and move you deeply. I always feel the spirit the strongest when music is involved. I love the peace that this gospel brings. I’m so grateful to know “there is no end…” like the hymn says. Our prayers are with you and Bonnie and the whole family during this ordeal. Your words on this blog truly are an inspiration, so thank you again for sharing.

    • Thanks for your comment Janelle. Similar to what you said, I find that I feel the spirit most frequently and most strongly through the hymns. I’m grateful that they’re an integral part of our meetings.

  2. Beautiful post, Adam. This was quite touching and it’s nice to get some insight into your thoughts and feelings on this whole situation. Keep writing!

    • Thanks Whitney. It was nice to see you yesterday and have you take some pictures. I’m excited to see how they turn out.

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